Curriculum

 Our Vision and Values for our Curriculum

Temple Learning Academy is at the heart of the community and we have the community in our hearts. Our curriculum is designed to achieve the aspirations of all our families and to meet the learning and development needs of all our children, responding to the uniqueness of each individual through exceptional, personalised provision.

Temple Learning Academy is a genuine all-through school and our curriculum must deliver continuous progression and successful learning experiences for all pupils as they move through each phase of our school. All Learning Phases (1, 2, 3 and 4) are equally important, and this is reflected in our Leadership and Governance and throughout our school. Our mission and our passion are about combining the best “primary” practice and best “secondary” practice, and exploring the wealth of opportunities that come from understanding children’s learning and progress in our school as one continuous journey from ages 4 to 16.

Our entire community, led by our Governors, has an ambition for change. This demands an exciting, innovative and first-rate curriculum that delivers exceptional progress and transforms children’s lives. Our curriculum is fundamentally inclusive and provides equality of opportunity for everyone: overcoming disadvantage and other barriers to learning to ensure future success for all our pupils as they progress into adult life and into future education and employment.

Our values which underpin our curriculum are:

Creativity: We value everyone’s ideas, contributions and interests. Embracing the new prepares us for the future.

Resilience: We always learn from our mistakes and keep trying until we achieve our goals.

Ambition: We aim high to be the best we can be; we are confident in the pursuit of this goal and proud of our successes.

Inclusivity: We value the gifts each individual brings and we respect and celebrate our talents, similarities and differences.

Care: We are responsible for ourselves and have a moral responsibility for those around us locally and globally.

Our holistic curriculum raises achievement for all, developing ‘the whole child’ and exceptional attitudes to learning so that children make outstanding progress academically and through the unique richness of the life of the school. All of our pupils will be successful because they will develop enquiring minds and master independent learning skills; they will be responsible, confident, brave, resilient and emotionally intelligent; they will be highly literate and numerate and fully equipped for work and the world around them; they will have a secure future and they will understand their role and responsibilities as local, national and global citizens. They are the leaders of the future and we understand that their unique potential has no limits.

Our Intent: The Objectives of our Curriculum

All-through Progression and Continuity

Every aspect of our curriculum is designed as part of our continuous, all-though programmes of learning. We maximise links between year groups and Phases, building on prior learning and avoiding the barriers and transitions that can sometimes be problematic in other schools and educational settings. This includes specific links between otherwise “separate” year groups: Reception and Year 5; Year 1 and Year 6; Year 2 and Year 7; Year 3 and Year 8; Year 4 and Year 9. We also work in partnership with other schools and agencies to support the transition and future success of new (“mobile”) pupils who join our school after their peers.

In Phase 1, teachers assess the prior learning, development, experiences and needs of children before they join us in Reception. The whole team of staff, children and families work together throughout Phase 1, blending the best practice from Reception and Year 1 so that children have the best possible start in our school and are fully prepared for the curriculum in Phase 2. In each subsequent Phase, teachers are able to share expert and detailed assessment and information about children’s prior learning, development, experiences and needs.

In Phases 2 and 3, leaders and teachers work together and with families and with colleagues in partner schools to maximise progression and continuity from Years 2 to 8. This includes a much more cohesive approach to the transition from Year 6 to Year 7, where (in future years) 50% of any Year 7 cohort will be pupils already in Temple Learning Academy during Year 6 and 50% will be pupils in our partner primary schools during Year 6. Teachers (many of whom work cross-phase) develop explicit links between year groups, and the all-through programmes of learning maximise opportunities and progress for children. This includes pupils experiencing a wider variety of subject-specialist teaching and resources at an earlier age, and older pupils having the opportunities, responsibilities and expert support that come from working with staff and children in younger year groups.

In Phase 4, leaders and teachers work closely together and with colleagues in partner schools to maximise progression and continuity from Years 9 to 11. Thanks to their learning and experiences in Phases 1, 2 and 3, children are successful independent learners and are better equipped for the challenges of national Key Stage 4 programmes of study. The whole team of staff, children and families work together throughout Phase 4, building in particular on the detailed assessment and information about children’s prior learning, development, experiences and needs from Phase 3. Children are supported in following a broad and balanced curriculum that allows them to further develop their expertise in specialist subjects whilst also maintaining a focus on a full range of subjects that will prepare them for future life, education, employment and training. This could include both academic and vocational programmes of study. Our aim is that at least 80% of Phase 4 pupils will continue to study the full range of EBacc subjects, and at least 60% of Phase 4 pupils will sit final Key Stage 4 examinations in the full range of EBacc subjects.

Achieving the Highest Expectations

Our curriculum nurtures an exceptional ethos and culture of learning, founded upon the highest expectations for academic progress and children’s development and behaviour. Teachers have a comprehensive understanding of children’s prior learning and individual needs, and can therefore plan for accelerated rates of progress from day one.

All children follow a challenging curriculum, assessed against high age-related expectations that are standardised across the high-performing, TNLP Co-operative Trust of local partner schools. During learning, children are challenged to demonstrate the “deepest” learning possible. Further stretch and challenge does not mean moving to a new area of learning; further stretch and challenge means demonstrating deeper learning in that area, moving towards “mastery” of a particular area of learning. Typically, this should involve more complex application of learning in new and challenging contexts.

Children make strong progress when they maintain or improve standards from previous years, as this demonstrates a consistent or deeper understanding of their learning as they progress through the challenging age-related curriculum. Our curriculum supports and challenges children to make very strong progress in areas where they need to “catch up” with their peers.

Reception is a unique and vitally important year where success is fundamental to children’s future learning, progress and life chances. Rates of progress need to be even greater in Reception to address starting points that are often below and well below age-related expectations, so that children can “catch up” with their peers nationally and be ready for the challenges and expectations of the years ahead.

Delivering a Holistic Approach through a Broad and Balanced Curriculum

Our holistic curriculum raises achievement for all, developing ‘the whole child’ and exceptional attitudes to learning so that children make outstanding progress academically and through the unique richness of the life of the school. Our holistic approach ensures the right balance between the academic and pastoral needs and learning of our children. Both are equally important and are addressed through all aspects of teachers’ planning for provision.

As detailed in the EYFS framework, there are three areas that are particularly crucial for igniting all children’s curiosity and enthusiasm for learning, and for building their capacity to learn, form relationships and thrive. These three areas, the EYFS prime areas, are: communication and language; physical development; and personal, social and emotional development. Our broad and balanced curriculum and the approaches developed by all of our staff reflect how these prime areas are crucial for children of all ages.

Responding to Children’s Needs

Children develop and learn in different ways and at different rates. All aspects of our curriculum and teachers’ planning for provision must be responsive to ongoing assessment of the children’s needs and a full understanding of their prior learning and experiences.

Children learn to be strong and independent through positive relationships. Children also learn and develop well in enabling environments, in which their experiences are planned around their individual needs and there is a strong partnership between staff and families and children. All aspects of our curriculum will seek to maximise the power of our partnerships with children, families, and other schools, agencies and organisations.

Inclusion and Equality of Opportunity

Every child is a unique child, who is constantly learning and can be resilient, capable, confident and self-assured. Teachers’ planning specifically addresses the depth of learning and pace of progression through the curriculum for pupils with different starting points and different additional learning needs.

Pupils are grouped in a variety of mixed-attainment classes to secure achievement for all and to strengthen our cohesive learning community. Our curriculum, teaching and assessment ensure equality of opportunity and challenge for all pupils, and differentiated approaches deepen the learning for all pupils. Even deeper learning is secured through enrichment and extension activities, including homework. Sometimes pupils are grouped by current levels of development for more linear approaches to learning, such as in the teaching of phonics.

Pupils with identified Special Educational Needs benefit from three different levels of additional support. Tier 1 is planned additional support in the classroom, often delivered by the class teacher or a teaching assistant. Tier 2 is planned additional support in addition to classroom provision, co-ordinated and tracked by the Phase Leader across a number of different classes and groups; this often involves small group intervention sessions delivered by teachers and/or teaching assistants. Tier 3 is planned additional support that is co-ordinated and tracked by the Academy SENDCO. This often involves specialist teaching and provision, and can be supported by additional funding for individual pupils.

Overcoming Disadvantage

We believe that the most effective approaches to raising achievement for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds are often the most effective approaches to raising achievement for all pupils. Therefore, every aspect of our Academy’s vision, culture and provision are designed to maximise the learning and progress of all pupils, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

In addition, we use Pupil Premium funding to further enhance the key parts of our curriculum that will best support pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds in overcoming their most common barriers to learning. These approaches are detailed in our Pupil Premium Strategy.

Mastering the Fundamentals of English and Mathematics

Pupils master an excellent understanding of the fundamental basics in English and Mathematics. Robust assessment drives our evaluation of their learning and progress and informs their next steps. There are key times every day for English, Mathematics, literacy skills, numeracy skills and reading. Pupils take risks with big ideas and use and apply the basics of English and Mathematics in a variety of contexts. Literacy and numeracy teaching, assessment and curricular targets underpin pupils’ learning across the entire curriculum. Pupils love reading: they experience all types of literature and they understand and use language in rich and diverse ways.

Our Intent: The Content of our Curriculum

The vast majority of the knowledge and understanding that pupils will acquire through our curriculum is based upon the national curriculum, shaped by the TNLP Co-operative Trust Curriculum that has been developed in partnership with other primary and secondary schools.

The curriculum areas that apply throughout each phase in the Academy are:

Personal, Social and Emotional Development. This includes:

         Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) – including use of the Thrive framework

         Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE)

         Sex and Relationships Education (SRE)

Communication and Language

         Reading

           Writing

Mathematics

Understanding the World. This includes:

         Science

         Geography and History

Modern Foreign Languages

Religious Education (RE)

British Values and Citizenship

Design and Technology

Arts

         Physical Development and Physical Education

         Careers Education, Information and Guidance (CEIAG) & Employability

         Enrichment opportunities, including extra-curricular enrichment activities

 

Cross-curricular topic and theme-based approaches are used to inspire and respond to pupils’ questions and interests, enhancing connectivity between different subjects and different aspects of our curriculum. This is called the TEMPLE integrated curriculum. Pupils will deepen their learning and their understanding of the world around them through project-based learning. This integrated approach will drive progress in numeracy and literacy (especially communication and writing as detailed in the National Curriculum programme of study for English), applying the fundamental basics of English and Mathematics in a variety of contexts.

The wider curriculum – and particularly the TEMPLE Curriculum – will be built around six core elements that will characterise successful learning:

TEAMWORK – Collaborative learning and pride in our communities.

EMPATHY – Understanding different people, different places and different ideas.

MEMORABLE LEARNING – Exciting projects linked to the real world, real events and real people.

PERSONAL GROWTH – Metacognition, self-regulation, taking risks and never giving up.

LEADERSHIP – Being role models, taking responsibility and leading the learning of others.

EXPERTISE – Mastery of new learning; being fully equipped for work and the world around us.

Our Implementation of our Curriculum

Phase 1

In Reception our children follow a curriculum that is co-designed across the TNLP Co-operative Trust and is also responsive to our children’s individual needs. Here children engage in a journey of discovery and exploration. The children often initiate their own learning through play as well as engaging in regular group and whole-class activities directed by an adult. We create a happy and caring environment where all children feel valued and relaxed and where they will have the opportunity to develop positive relationships with all the adults who care for them. Every day, there are opportunities for the children to choose from a range of activities, both indoors and outdoors, where they can explore, experiment, learn and develop at their own rate as they work through the Early Years framework towards the end of Reception standard or Early Learning Goals (ELGs). In Year 1 children also follow the TNLP curriculum, based upon the National Curriculum, with the goal of achieving End of Year 1 Age-Related Expectations.

Personal, social and emotional development is addressed across the curriculum and throughout the culture of the Phase, and more specifically through structured and unstructured play, enrichment activities and SEAL-themed assemblies every day. Through the curriculum we promote healthy, independent, responsible and resilient members of society. There is a clear emphasis on children understanding and responding to their own feelings and those of others, knowing their bodies and learning about relationships. They are taught how to stay safe including recognising and responding appropriately to danger. We make sure that they know about safe and unsafe substances, the consequences of choice and how to say no. We also deal with healthy lifestyles, healthy eating and personal hygiene. We want all of our children to develop emotional resilience and to be able to deal with adversity in positive ways. SEAL (Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning) topics are developed each term and are introduced during a whole school assembly. The SEAL topic is then revisited on a weekly basis through assembly stories.

Autumn 1: New Beginnings

Autumn 2: Say No to Bullying

Spring 1: Going For Goals

Spring 2: Getting On and Falling Out

Summer 1: Good to be Me

Summer 2: Changes

Over one hour per day is devoted to the discrete teaching of communication, reading – including systematic synthetic phonics – and writing. Over one hour per day is devoted to the discrete teaching of mathematics. There are also frequent opportunities throughout the week for children to practise and consolidate their growing knowledge in all of these fundamental areas. Over three hours per day is devoted to all other areas of the curriculum.

Language development underpins all the learning that takes place in school, as a child’s language is the medium through which he or she learns about other subjects. English makes a major contribution to the development of a child’s language which, in turn, contributes to the child’s understanding of his/her world, the world of others and the world of imagination. Since English is integral to the learning process throughout the curriculum, it follows that whenever anything is being taught or learned there is potential for developing a child’s language.

While there are discrete English lessons each day, literacy skills, in particular speaking and listening and writing, are used and developed in every curriculum area. Taught Literacy sessions ensure that children are engaged in a variety of activities matched to their specific needs. Play, storytelling, talking about their own experiences and ideas, drama and improvisation provide a sound base in Reception and Year 1 with an emphasis on pupils exploring and expressing their own world. Teaching and learning styles mix instruction; group collaboration; paired work; practical activity, performance; individual research and investigation with appropriate strategies to encourage effective learning through language, such as sharing learning intentions and success criteria and opportunities to review and evaluate.

Reading is at the heart of the curriculum. Phonics teaching will follow the “Read, Write Inc.” method, and in Phase 1, phonics teaching initially forms the basis of all literacy learning. As children progress, they read out loud frequently from carefully selected books that closely matched their phonic knowledge, and story time is an invaluable part of our daily routine. In reading we use a variety of approaches such as: shared reading, independent reading and guided reading. These strategies enable children to construct meaning from a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts: a strong decoding and spelling foundation using a blend of phonics and visual techniques to suit the learning needs of the individual child. Whole texts are used as the basis for learning in all areas of literacy. Additional reading support will be put in place for individuals according to need at the discretion of the class teacher.

Writing has an essential role in the curriculum as a whole. Writing opportunities interest and engage children so that they learn to become thoughtful, reflective and evaluative writers. They write for a range of audiences and purposes and throughout the teaching and learning of writing, they develop an understanding of how to write a broad range of text types (fiction, non-fiction and poetry). They are taught to use and choose a rich range of vocabulary which reflects their authorial intent and desired impact on a reader. They also learn to employ a range of sentence constructions that ensure that writing is interesting, clear and concise. Children build a repertoire of skills that allow them to control and shape whole texts, thus becoming adept and adaptable writers with transferable skills across the whole of our curriculum.

In mathematics, children develop the following core elements: mathematical habits of mind; value mathematics; master basic facts; be mentally agile; be creative problem solvers; tackle complex problems with confidence; read, write and discuss mathematics; apply mathematics in other subject areas and begin to understand and appreciate the role of mathematics in the world. Understanding mathematics is an essential life skill and all our children need to become confident mathematicians. This means that the curriculum and teaching need to address not only the mastery of basic skills and recording but also have a progressive focus on real life mathematics and the more advanced concepts. We know that there are persistent gaps between the mathematics performance of primary school children from different backgrounds and with different characteristics. We will make sure that the structure of our curriculum, the teaching strategies and personalised learning programmes are used to reduce these gaps. We structure the teaching of Mathematics to have a focus on the mastery of mental skills, the teaching of ‘number’. This ensures that children can have a secure understanding and grasp of the concrete skills that are required for more abstract features of mathematical understanding. The teaching of number is crucial in building children’s mathematical fluency. We frequently use practical equipment to support children’s grasp of numbers and, importantly, to develop their understanding of linking concrete experience with visual and symbolic representations. When their understanding is more secure, we introduce more formal, written recording and problem solving. We use an approach called ‘Big Maths’ in which children learn across ‘progress drives’.

Computing and the use of technology is based upon the National Curriculum programmes of study. Children have access to laptops and i-pads throughout their working week, often incorporating this technology into their daily lessons. We support the children to become confident, safe and appropriate users of ICT who are well prepared for a technology rich future.

In Phase 1, understanding the world (through our TEMPLE curriculum) is informed by the International Primary Curriculum (IPC). The IPC is a comprehensive, thematic, creative curriculum for 3-12 year olds, with a clear process of learning and with specific learning goals for every subject, for international mindedness and for personal learning. This is further enhanced with local experiences. This way our children learn about local and wider societies and their roles and responsibilities within these.

Religious Education (RE): Non-denominational Religious Education will be provided for all children as part of the curriculum and will be in accordance with the locally agreed Leeds Religious Education syllabus. Parents and carers will have the right to withdraw their children from Religious Education and collective worship should they so wish. If parents and carers do not wish their child to be taught the agreed syllabus or take part in short acts of collective worship then we will request they inform us in writing. If the child is excused, suitable alternative arrangements will be made. We hold assemblies daily as an important time for the children unity to come together to celebrate achievements. It is also an opportunity for collective worship and a time for singing and music making and also a time when we place an emphasis on the development of values and attitudes towards each other and the world around us. Assemblies are non-denominational, although they will be of a broadly Christian nature, however due consideration is given to the multicultural society in which we live, building on our value of international mindedness. We will respect the wishes of families who do not wish for their child to participate in collective worship.

British Values and Citizenship: Across the curriculum (and particularly through Temple curriculum topics) we promote the fundamental British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

As well as increasing children’s knowledge and understanding in physical education we want children to develop positive attitudes towards physical activity and have a wide range of formal and informal experiences. Participation in physical activities helps to improve pupils’ self-esteem and confidence and also their sense of wellbeing. A central aim of our physical education curriculum is to cultivate a love of activity and to complement cognitive learning. We promote the benefits of physical activity and ensure that children are aware of the link between physical activity, healthy eating and a healthy lifestyle. We will be sensitive to cultural issues that may influence children’s participation and that of their families. We intend that every child will be physically fit with a sense of wellbeing. They have the opportunity to develop any individual physical talents to a more advanced level and also to participate in competitive activities. We base our formal lessons on the national curriculum programmes of study. We provide all Phase 1 children with more than two hours per week of PE, with further opportunities through play, enrichment activities and our extended curriculum offer in which we provide physical activity sessions after school. These are designed so that parents and other community members are able to participate or indeed to lead activities. These sessions include dance, a wide range of exercise classes, games, skipping and many more activities that can be continued out of school.

Careers Education, Information and Guidance (CEIAG) in Phase 1 involves children experiencing the widest possible range of activities and opportunities to learn about different jobs and roles in the world of work.

Phase 2

There are discrete English lessons of at least one hour each day; also a variety of literacy skills, in particular speaking and listening and writing, are used and developed in every curriculum area. Taught Literacy sessions ensure that children are engaged in a variety of activities matched to their specific needs. Drama, visualisation and partner work are used to help children rehearse and practise what they want to write. They are encouraged to constantly review, edit and improve their written compositions. Spelling and handwriting are very important and we send core spellings home. Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG) are taught daily and pupils learn the mechanics of sentences for reading and writing.

Reading is at the heart of the curriculum and taught in a variety of ways. Children read a wide range of challenging and stimulating texts: they experience all types of literature and they understand and use language in rich and diverse ways. Children will take part in shared, guided, individual and whole class reading. Comprehension skills are key in Phase 2 and we build on what children have gained in Phase 1. When children can read without decoding the focus will move to written comprehension and more complex inference based activities.

Over one hour per day is devoted to the discrete teaching of Mathematics and Mathematics is also embedded across the curriculum. As well as typical number focus, statistics and shape, space and measure are used in a variety of other subject areas. Basic skills such as addition, subtraction and place value knowledge are developed and mastered through problem solving and reasoning. We encourage our pupils to ask why and how? They explore and ask what if? They talk about their findings and why they have made certain decisions. Multiplication and Division are embedded in Phase 2 and we ensure pupils learn and become familiar with their multiplication tables. We develop children’s skills with time, money and fractions and work on securing their knowledge.

All other subjects are taught through the integrated Temple Curriculum. The topics have been planned to cover all National Curriculum objectives for the specific age groups. The different subjects (History, Geography, Science, Computing, Music, Art and Technology) are woven through the whole curriculum to enable pupils to master a variety of skills through different forms of teaching and learning. We create exciting opportunities for children to become immersed in the topics and develop their skills in different ways. We have a native Spanish speaker working with children once a week to develop their language skills. They are learning basic Spanish which can be built on as they move through school, including topics like greetings, numbers, colours, family and feelings.

Religious Education (RE): Non-denominational Religious Education will be provided for all children as part of the curriculum and will be in accordance with the locally agreed Leeds Religious Education syllabus. Parents and carers will have the right to withdraw their children from Religious Education and collective worship should they so wish. If parents and carers do not wish their child to be taught the agreed syllabus or take part in short acts of collective worship then we will request they inform us in writing. If the child is excused, suitable alternative arrangements will be made. We hold assemblies daily as an important time for the children unity to come together to celebrate achievements. It is also an opportunity for collective worship and a time for singing and music making and also a time when we place an emphasis on the development of values and attitudes towards each other and the world around us. Assemblies are non-denominational, although they will be of a broadly Christian nature, however due consideration is given to the multicultural society in which we live, building on our value of international mindedness. We will respect the wishes of families who do not wish for their child to participate in collective worship.

British Values and Citizenship: Across the curriculum (and particularly through Temple curriculum topics) we promote the fundamental British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

Physical Development and Physical Education inspires children to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. Our curriculum encourages all pupils to develop a life-long love of physical exercise, developing children’s physical literacy and, crucially, their social and emotional understanding.  One discrete two hour PE lesson per week ensures each child is challenged in a variety of sports and activities that enhance cognitive development, problem solving, leadership, team work, confidence and self- esteem as well as developing their understanding of a healthy active lifestyle.  All children follow a broad and balanced sporting curriculum, including invasion games, gymnastics, dance, multi-skills and athletics to produce well rounded, physically fit and happy children. A wide variety of extra -curricular and lunch time clubs give all children the opportunity to develop independent learning as well as mastery in their chosen sporting club. We aspire to ensure all children have the opportunity to develop their sporting talents by participating in a wide variety of competitive opportunities both in school and city-wide.

Careers Education, Information and Guidance (CEIAG) in Phase 2 involves children experiencing the widest possible range of activities and opportunities to learn about different jobs and roles in the world of work.

Phase 3

Personal, social and emotional development is addressed across the curriculum, and specifically through one hour of discrete PSED teaching per week and two hours of discrete THRIVE enrichment activities per week. Children learn together in smaller groups, developing social and emotional aspects of their learning through an even wider variety of creative and extraordinary enrichment activities.

Communication and language are fundamental across the curriculum and assessed by all teachers based upon children’s learning and development in all subjects. Children learn vital speaking and listening skills and how to adapt their communication for a variety of audiences and purposes.

Reading is at the heart of the curriculum. Children build upon the higher standards that they have achieved previously and follow the National Curriculum programme of study for English, particularly focused on developing analytical and critical thinking. Children read a wide range of challenging and stimulating texts: they experience all types of literature and they understand and use language in rich and diverse ways. This includes their own personal reading choices, reading programmes and the study of one “class reader” text per half term. Reading skills are specifically enhanced through three hours per week of discrete teaching that we call Literature. This may often include the use of drama. Class reading takes place daily, and Accelerated Reader is used as an online assessment and tracking tool for supporting the development of all children’s reading ages and comprehension skills. Children who need extra support to “catch up” on age-related expectations for reading receive specialist teaching and intervention to accelerate their reading progress.

Writing is a substantial focus in Phase 3 and over half of the children’s week involves engaging in developing writing skills and extended writing for a variety of audiences and purposes. Writing is assessed by all teachers based upon children’s learning and development in all subjects, but more specifically writing is taught through the TEMPLE curriculum, where children write in depth about their meaningful and memorable learning based upon a wide range of challenging topics about the world around them. Children receive feedback and areas for improvement from teachers so that they can review, edit and improve their written compositions.

Mathematics is also a substantial focus in Phase 3 and fundamental skills and concepts are reinforced in other subject areas and through the TEMPLE curriculum. Mathematical knowledge, understanding, problem solving and reasoning are specifically taught through four hours per week of discrete teaching. We use the best aspects of the national curriculum, TNLP curriculum and White Rose maths mastery programmes to create a cohesive and meaningful approach that builds on the children’s prior learning. Children build upon the higher standards that they have achieved previously and they have regular opportunities to practise fundamental basics and to apply these to a range of investigations and problem-solving activities. We particularly focus on ensuring that children have mastered all aspects of number so that they can apply this fundamental knowledge to more complex problems and mathematical concepts as they progress towards Phase 4. Children who need extra support to “catch up” on age-related expectations for mathematics receive specialist teaching and intervention to accelerate their progress, including detailed work on the topics that were not yet secure in the End of Key Stage 2 Tests at the end of Year 6.

Science (especially hands-on, investigative science) is a crucial part of the curriculum, and children make excellent progress through specialist provision. All children benefit from four hours of discrete science teaching and at least one experiment per week takes place in our inspirational science laboratory. Children explore, investigate and develop their understanding of the fundamental building blocks of the universe through Chemistry, Physics and Biology. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all children are taught the essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, children recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

Geography and History provide the main content of the integrated TEMPLE curriculum. A wide range of exciting and thought-provoking topics (a) help children gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world and (b) inspire children’s curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. Children learn to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps children to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time. Geography equips pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. As children progress, their growing knowledge about the world helps them to deepen their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes, and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. Geographical knowledge, understanding and skills provide the frameworks and approaches that explain how the Earth’s features at different scales are shaped, interconnected and change over time.

Modern Foreign Languages involves one hour of discrete Spanish teaching per week and two after-school clubs where children explore a variety of culture and languages, including French, German and the first languages of children who speak English as an Additional Language. We have a native Spanish Speaker working with Year 7 to develop their language skills. They are learning basic Spanish which can be built on as the children move through school. In Year 7, children cover topics such as greetings, numbers, colours, family and feelings.

Religious Education (RE): Non-denominational Religious Education will be provided for all children as part of the curriculum and will be in accordance with the locally agreed Leeds Religious Education syllabus. Parents and carers will have the right to withdraw their children from Religious Education and collective worship should they so wish. If parents and carers do not wish their child to be taught the agreed syllabus or take part in short acts of collective worship then we will request they inform us in writing. If the child is excused, suitable alternative arrangements will be made.

British Values and Citizenship: Across the curriculum (and particularly through Temple curriculum topics) we promote the fundamental British Values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

In Phase 3, there are four to six hours per week of discrete lessons for Design and Technology and Arts. Design and Technology involves using creativity and imagination to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering children’s own and others’ needs, wants and values. Children study a wide range of technology specialisms (including food technology) and acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on other disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Children learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world.

Arts involves children exploring creativity, design and performance through an integrated approach to music, art, photography, textiles, drama and other elements of the arts. Art engages, inspires and challenges children, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. As children progress, they begin to think critically and develop a more rigorous understanding of art and design. They also know how art and design both reflect and shape our history, and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of our nation. Music is a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. Children develop a love of music and their talent as musicians, and so increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement. As children progress, they develop a critical engagement with music, allowing them to compose, and to listen with discrimination to the best in the musical canon. Drama involves children improvising, rehearsing and performing play scripts and other performance pieces in order to generate language and discuss language use and meaning, using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Physical Development and Physical Education inspires children to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically-demanding activities. Our curriculum encourages all pupils to develop a life-long love of physical exercise, developing children’s physical literacy and, crucially, their social and emotional understanding.  At least one discrete two hour PE lesson per week ensures each child is challenged in a variety of sports and activities that enhance cognitive development, problem solving, leadership, team work, confidence and self- esteem as well as developing their understanding of a healthy active lifestyle.  All children follow a broad and balanced sporting curriculum, including invasion games, gymnastics, dance, multi-skills and athletics to produce well rounded, physically fit and happy children. A wide variety of extra -curricular and lunch time clubs give all children the opportunity to develop independent learning as well as mastery in their chosen sporting club. We aspire to ensure all children have the opportunity to develop their sporting talents by participating in a wide variety of competitive opportunities both in school as well city-wide.

Careers Education, Information and Guidance (CEIAG) in Phase 3 involves children experiencing the widest possible range of activities and opportunities to learn about the career choices and challenges that they will face in their future adult life. Across the curriculum, and particularly through the TEMPLE curriculum, expertise and mastery of subject content is emphasised as a fundamental aspect of progression into future careers. During Year 8, specific guidance is given to children about how the curriculum that they study links to future education, employment and training.